Artist Trying To Build Helicopiter Out Of Cow, Turned Dead Cat Into A Drone

It all started in 2012, when his cat Orville got hit by a car.

It all started in 2012, when his cat Orville got hit by a car.

Cris Toala Olivares/Reuters

Jansen decided it would be a shame to simply bury his feline friend, so he drew inspiration from his pet’s eponym — Orville Wright, one of the aeroplane-inventing Wright brothers. Jansen gutted Orville, preserved him, and turned him into a custom quadcopter.

Jansen decided it would be a shame to simply bury his feline friend, so he drew inspiration from his pet's eponym — Orville Wright, one of the aeroplane-inventing Wright brothers. Jansen gutted Orville, preserved him, and turned him into a custom quadcopter.

The response was huge. Jansen had recruited the help of technical engineer Arjen Beltman to design and help fly his “half-cat, half-machine creation,” and it was covered everywhere from Mail Online to Forbes.

The response was huge. Jansen had recruited the help of technical engineer Arjen Beltman to design and help fly his "half-cat, half-machine creation," and it was covered everywhere from Mail Online to Forbes.

Matt Rudge(GB)/Bart Jansen

According to the Los Angeles Times, the unconventional drone caused “global outrage” after footage of it went viral. The “Orvillecopter,” as Jansen calls it, was subsequently exhibited as the KunstRai art festival in Amsterdam.

According to the Los Angeles Times, the unconventional drone caused "global outrage" after footage of it went viral. The "Orvillecopter," as Jansen calls it, was subsequently exhibited as the KunstRai art festival in Amsterdam.

Cris Toala Olivares/Reuters

Source.

After that success, Jansen got more ambitious. In 2013, his next project was again using a taxidermy animal as its base — but a far larger one. Jansen asked around local farms for a suitable animal, and one eventually got back to him with news of a recently deceased candidate: an ostrich.

After that success, Jansen got more ambitious. In 2013, his next project was again using a taxidermy animal as its base — but a far larger one. Jansen asked around local farms for a suitable animal, and one eventually got back to him with news of a recently deceased candidate: an ostrich.

Bart Jansen

“Getting the shape done was the most difficult part,” Jansen told Wired. “I looked at hundreds of pictures of live ostriches, dead ones, skinned ones to try and figure out what its body looked like. I had to then fit the skin around it and found that in some places I had too much foam and in others not enough. The skin then got a bit mildewy and I had to take it back to the taxidermist to treat it.”

"Getting the shape done was the most difficult part," Jansen told Wired. "I looked at hundreds of pictures of live ostriches, dead ones, skinned ones to try and figure out what its body looked like. I had to then fit the skin around it and found that in some places I had too much foam and in others not enough. The skin then got a bit mildewy and I had to take it back to the taxidermist to treat it."

Matt Rudge (GB)/Bart Jansen

Beltman was at it again with a solo project in 2014, giving a schoolboy’s dead rat the Orville treatment.

Beltman was at it again with a solo project in 2014, giving a schoolboy's dead rat the Orville treatment.

Matt Rudge (GB)/Bart Jansen

Source.

“When I learned he had cancer and the vet had to put him to sleep I was very upset,” 13-year-old Pepeijn Bruins said of his pet, “Ratjetoe.” “I had seen Bart and Arjen and their flying cat, and I asked my dad if it would be possible to have the rat fly.” Beltman was only too happy to oblige, transforming the deceased rodent into a remote-controlled flying machine.

 

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