Worldwide Supermoon 2016 To Show Tonight, November 14 2016

Starting in Australia, moving on through Japan and into China before it gets to Europe and the UK tonightImage result for supermoon november 2016

Tonight’s moon will be the biggest and brightest in living memory – and people around the world will be watching just after the sun sets.

During the event, the moon will appear up to 14% bigger and 30% brighter than an average full moon.

It will be at its biggest in decades, and offer brilliant photo opportunities, according to experts.

Last night the moon was almost as bright, and will continue to dazzle throughout the week, but it will be at its brightest tonight.

Sunset in the UK will take place at 16.12, and the moon rise is expected at around 16.44.

But it will be viewed at its best around 20.09, and it is best to avoid light pollution, such as street lights, when viewing it.

If the weather co-operates, we could be in for a stunning lunar sight.
      Sydney Harbour Bridge
 The supermoon rising over New York City, behind the Statue Of Liberty.

However, other countries are already witnessing the supermoon in their skies.

In Australia, sky-watchers climbed to the top of the Sydney Harbour Bridge to get a closer view of the supermoon.

The large moon ducked between the clouds over Sydney on Monday evening, with crowds lining up to take photographs.

A surfer surfs the waves in front of the the supermoon in Hawaii.
The biggest supermoon for 70 years rises over the Severn Bridge.
The brightest supermoon in almost 70 years over San Diego.

This is the closest the moon will get to Earth until 25 November 2034, so you really don’t want to miss this one.

 

The supermoon will also bring stronger than usual high tides, followed by plunging low tides the next morning.

What is a supermoon?A supermoon usually takes place every one to two years, when the full moon coincides with its closest point to Earth during its monthly orbit.

Because the moon has an elliptical orbit, one side – called the perigee – is about 48,280 km (30,000 miles) closer to Earth than the other side (the apogee).

When the sun, the moon, and Earth line up as the moon orbits Earth, that’s known as syzygy (definitely something you want to keep in your back pocket for your next Scrabble match).

When this Earth-Moon-Sun system occurs with the perigee side of the moon facing us, and the moon happens to be on the opposite side of Earth from the sun, we get what’s called a perigee-syzygy.

That causes the moon to appear much bigger and brighter in our sky than usual, and it’s referred to as a supermoon – or more technically, a perigee moon.

What time is the supermoon?

A commercial jet flies in front of the moon on its approach to Heathrow in London

The supermoon is expected to reach the peak of its full phase at 13.52 GMT, meaning most countries will have the best chance of seeing it shortly after sunset.

Sunset in the UK will take place at 16.12, and the moon rise is expected at around 16.44, so you can watch out for it any time after that.

Why is this one special?

The moon rises over the Chicago Harbor Light

Because the November 14 moon becomes full within about two hours of perigee, it’s going to look the biggest it has in nearly seven decades.

“The full moon of November 14 is not only the closest full moon of 2016, but also the closest full moon to date in the 21st century,” an NASA spokesperson said.

“The full moon won’t come this close to Earth again until 25 November 2034.”

What does it mean?

Doomsday preppers are already claiming the supermoon is a sign that the apocalypse is imminent.

The last time the supermoon was this close, in 1948, the state of Israel was declared an independent nation, leading some to associate it with religious and political change.Some even believe that the cosmic event could bring about the second coming – with the recent opening of Christ’s tomb.

How to see it

If you’re planning on viewing the November 14 supermoon, be sure to get somewhere nice and dark, away from the lights of the city, if you can.

As long as the sky is clear, you’ll have some awesome opportunities to take pictures overnight

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